ENDAU ROMPIN NATIONAL PARK, JOHORE - SURVIVAL MALAYSIA

JUNGLE SURVIVAL TRAINING COURSE, team building, adventure package in Malaysia

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SURVIVAL COURSE PRICING

2 - 3 pax

4 - 5 pax

6 - 9 pax

Above 10 pax

CODE ER 010
3D/2N FULL BOARD
Survival Course Kg Selai, Endau Rompin Selai
$ 1000.00
$ 650.00
$ 550.00
$500.00
CODE ER 011
4D/3N FULL BOARD
Survival Course Kg Selai, Endau Rompin Selai
$ 1300.00
$ 800.00
$ 700.00
$ 600.00
         
BASIC SURVIVAL COURSE PRICING        
CODE ER 012
3D/2N FULL BOARD
Basic Survival Course Kg Selai, Endau Rompin Selai
$ 750.00
$ 500.00
$ 480.00
$ 450.00
All rates  are subject to 10% service charge and 4.5% e-commerce charge for payment bycredit card.

++++ Please contact us for students rates

 

IMAGINE YOU ARE TREKKING IN A JUNGLE WITH SOME FRIENDS AND SUDDENLY YOU FOUND YOURSELF ALONE !

 

Here are some tips on what to do if you are in such a situation -  lost in the jungle.  To be lost simply means you are all alone and you cannot see or hear your friends anywhere. Your first reaction is do not panic.
 
Apply the S.T.O.P approach — Stop, Think, Observe and Plan.
 
STOP – Take a deep breath, sit down if possible, calm yourself and recognise that whatever has happened to get you here cannot be undone. You are now in a survival situation and that requires you to:
 
THINK – Your most important asset is your brain. Use it! Don’t panic! Move with deliberate care. Take no action, even a step forward, until you have thought it through.
 
OBSERVE – Take a look around you. Assess your situation and options. Take stock of your supplies, equipment and surroundings.
 
PLAN – Prioritize your immediate needs and develop a plan to systematically deal with the emergency. Make a plan and keep to it. Adjust your plan only as necessary to deal with changing circumstances.

 

Jungle survival Package Itineraries

 

 

Program ER010
Trip  Itinerary 4D 3N Survival Program

 

Day 1

Upon  arrival at Bekok, transfer by4 wheel drive to Lubok Pasir , briefing and  immediate distribution of equipment and food rations. Arrived at campsite at Lubok Pasir.


Things to learn, record and practice:
1. Making water bottles from Bamboo
2. Identifying/collection of edible/medicinal leaves " Senduduk " and " Selaput Tunggul "
3. Fashioning ropes from " Barok " or  " Kelemedu " tree barks to secure the bamboo water container
4. Identifying drinkable wild vines " Mengkait " and " Mempelas " available only in certain areas.

5. Set up net to catch fish for dinner.

 

Set up camp. The next class will be starting fires using available natural resources . Participants are to start and maintain their own for signaling and dinner  will be rice and  BBQ fish caught in the river.

 

Day 2
After breakfast, depart for the second camp site at Lubok Ajam. All fires are to be put out. Trekking will start from Lubok Pasir campsite to Kampong Selai. Lunch  consisting of local asli dishes will be provided bythe villagers. The morning trek is about 1 1/2 hours. Enroute, there will be things to be learned along the way and the guides will be on hand explain.

After lunch, continue trekking to Lubok Ajam   participants will be taught skills in cooking canned food (for dinner) and preserving it for several weeks in the jungle without going bad to be followed bya short lecture on survival essentials in the jungles, Next exercise is collection of firewood and starting/maintaining of fires.

 

1. Skills in predicting weather and time without using any modern equipment and night signaling.
2. Collection of " Damar " or dried saps from the " Meranti " tree as fuel and medicine
3. Collection of dried wood to carry forward to the next camp.


For dinner, we will teach the cooking method and we will provide rice and tapioca to be cooked  over fire using bamboo and other means and  participants are to boil their own drink also using bamboo. There will be a discussion on the previous 24 hours' activities.

 

Day 3

Wake up call from the gibbons at 0700hrs - we will provide coffee and bread  - the following practical classes will be organised at 0900 hrs


1. Primitive jungle navigation without using any modern navigation equipment
2. Trail making in lowland primary jungles
3. Signaling methods in the daytime

Departure for the next and final camp.
The trail enters into the wild " Bertam " forest. Upon arrival, participants are to immediately construct their own shelters using the leaves, branches and fronds of the " Bertam " tree as roofs, walls and sleeping mates. They will also be taught making light sticks using " Bertam " branches and leaves as a replacement for flashlights at 1400 hrs estimated arrival in one hour.

 

Participants will be required to practice what they've been taught namely
1. Set up their own shelter
2. Collection of firewood
3. Starting & maintenance fire for warmth, light and cooking.

4. Cooking rice and other available dishes in bamboo and wild leaf.


We will do impromptu inspection every few hours to ensure that the shelters are built to certain specifications, fires maintained well and the participants' safety ensured.

 

Day 4

Wake up call at 0700 hrs. Participants will assemble at camp commandant  shelter at 0830 hrs for a group assessment of every participant's shelter location with final comments and  tips. .


Depart  for for Kuala Lumpur  at 1430 hrs.

Note : The above itinerary is subject to change

Program ER011

Trip  Itinerary 3D 2N Survival Program

Day 1

Upon  arrival at Bekok, transfer by4 wheel drive to Lubok Pasir , briefing and  immediate distribution of equipment and food rations. Arrived at campsite at Lubok Pasir.. Participants will be divided into teams and will remain in the same team until the final day.


Things to learn, record and practice:

1. Making water bottles from Bamboo
2. Identifying/collection of edible/medicinal leaves " Senduduk " and " Selaput Tunggul "
3. Fashioning ropes from " Barok " or  " Kelemedu " tree barks to secure the bamboo water container
4. Identifying drinkable wild vines " Mengkait " and " Mempelas " available only in certain areas.

 5. Set up net to catch fish for dinner.

 

Set up camp. The next class will be starting fires using available natural resources . Participants are to start and maintain their own for signaling and dinner  will be rice and  BBQ fish caught in the river.

 

Day 2
After breakfast, depart for the second camp site at Lubok Merekek. All fires are to be put out. Trekking will start from Lubok Pasir campsite to Kampong Selai. Lunch  consisting of local asli dishes will be provided bythe villagers. The morning trek is about 1 1/2 hours. Enroute, there will be things to be learned along the way and the guides will be on hand explain.  
From the villlage, the group will be taken by4 WD  vehicles to Merekek campsite,

 

Next class will be on simple knots. Participants will be taught how to tie fishing hooks and finally placing the fishing line at the right places. 


Participants will be required to practice what they've been taught :

1. Set up their own shelter
2. Collection of firewood 

3. Starting & maintenance fire for warmth, light and cooking.

4. Cooking rice and other available dishes in bamboo and wild leaf.


We will do impromptu inspection every few hours to ensure that the shelters are built to certain specifications, fires maintained well and the participants' safety ensured.

 

Day 3

Wake up call at 0700 hrs. Participants will assemble at camp commandant  shelter at 0830 hrs for a group assessment of every participant's shelter location with final comments and  tips. .

 

Leisure activity, trekking to Takah Pandan Waterfalls.

Lunch will be provided and after lunch transfer by4WD to Bekok town.

 

Program ER 012

Trip  Itinerary 3D 2N  Basic Survival Program - Merekek Campsite

Day 1

Upon  arrival at Bekok, transfer by4 wheel drive to Merekek Campsite (participants will stay for two nights at Lubok Merekek) , briefing and  immediate distribution of equipment and food rations. Participants will be divided into teams and will remain in the same team until the final day.

 

A Basic Survival Kit

 

Pack these basic items: First Aid kit, whistle, compass, matches / lighter, mini torchlight / headlamp, pocket knife and light rain jacket/poncho in a drysack / waterproof pack and keep the pack with you all the time, even on a short hike. (A 4-litre drysack only costs about RM35). Most experienced trekkers swear bythe handy parang (machete).

“Ideally, aside from the basic kit, you should carry a flysheet/poncho with tent/kernmantle ropes (strong elastic rope made of sheathed nylon fibre), raffia string, extra food and water and enough dry, warm clothing to survive the elements,” says Azirin Aziz of Outward Bound Malaysia.

A tent in the form of a flysheet or poncho can double up as a raincoat and also as an emergency blanket to keep one safe from the risk of hypothermia. A tent rope may also be used as an ascending or descending line in the event of an emergency. Keep the candles and matches dry so you can start a fire, cook food, keep warm and send a smoke signal while you wait to be rescued, adds Azirin.
 
a_basic_survival_kit.jpg
 


Set up camp. First class will be starting fires using available natural resources . Participants are to start and learn to maintain their own. 
Participants will be taught how to tie fishing hooks and finally placing the fishing line at the right places. and dinner  will be rice and  BBQ fish caught from the river.

 

Day 2
After breakfast, briefing and day trekking will start from Lubok Merekek  campsite to Takah Tinggi waterfalls. Packed. lunch  consisting of local asli dishes will be provided. The trek is about 2 hours per way. Enroute, there will be things to be learned along the way and the guides will be on hand explain. Return to Merekek Campsite in the evening

 

For dinner participants will be be provided with local chicken already slaughtered. They will be taught how to remove the feathers and clean the chicken ready for cooking. The chicken will be cooked in two ways - BBQ over campfires and also inside bamboo with other ingredients provided.

 

Break camp and proceed to start fire to be maintain until the next morning. The program is as follows :

 

Participants will be required to practice what they've been taught :

1. Set up their own shelter
2. Collection of firewood 

3. Starting & maintenance fire for warmth, light and cooking.

4. Cooking rice and other available dishes in bamboo and wild leaf.


We will do impromptu inspection every few hours to ensure that the shelters are built to certain specifications, fires maintained well and the participants' safety ensured.

 

Day 3

Wake up call at 0700 hrs. Participants will assemble at camp commandant  shelter at 0830 hrs for a group assessment of every participant's shelter location with final comments and  tips. .

 

 

 

Leisure activity, white water tube rafting from Lubok Selow to Lubok Tapah.

A simple lunch will be provided and after lunch transfer by4WD to Bekok town.

 

Notes

From the air, the jungle looks like a sea of broccoli and a novice might be forgiven for thinking that the underneath is impenetrable.  It is not!

Under the treetop canopy, nature jostles to find a space to catch the sun’s rays, producing a litany of sounds and a library of sights. Myriads of insects help propagate new growth as well as slowly working to eradicate the old. Damp soil and a mulch of fallen leaves cushion noise but retain tracks for those who know how to read them. Birds and animals are heard rather than seen.

Navigation is a skill that anyone can learn ; map, compass and a retentive memory, along with a cool head, are the main requisites. The direction of stream flow, a rise of fall in contours, are normally the only aids in featureless terrains. But the depth of a stream, the thickness of the bush, the flight of the birds, the age of a track and many other signs are always there to be read like a book bythe initiated and turned into advantage when, to others with senses deadened and mind dulled bya depressing and endless similarity, the Jungle imposes itself as an environment which cannot be mastered.
 

 

Jungle Survival Skills, encompass the following......, not all are included in the above package,

but can be customised with a different costing

 
  1. Shelter Construction from simple overnight 'accommodations'. During our program you will learn to identify safe areas to build and type of material to build temporary shelters.

  2. Water Procurement from the jungle using water vines and other plant life.

  3. Edible Plants and Wildlife for food - this will include hunting, preparing traps, identify places where to set traps. Identify edible plants and roots.

  4. Traps, Improvised Survival Tactics, and other 'tricks of the trade.' These tactics are designed for use when drastic measures must be applied to preserve one's own life. From basic traps, such as snares, deadfalls and fish traps, to using weapons made from jungle products.

  5. The Offensive Mindset and learning to mentally cope and 'enjoy' adversities in order to overcome them. Confidence, application of skills, and becoming a part of the surrounding environment.

  6. Knife and Blade Work - During these expeditions you learn how to properly use and care for a jungle knife. Sharpening, proper cutting technique, developing the proper timing, and use as an improvised tool will all be covered since your participation in clearing log jams and constructing shelters is required.

  7. Medicinal Plants and the uses ranging from mosquito repellants to treating illness. In this topic you will also learn to assist yourself or teammates during accidents or other ills faced in a tropical jungle survival.

  8. Rafts You will learn to build temporary rafts and travel on it.

  9. Compass Orienteering and Tracking - This process will teach you to read a compass properly and describe proper safe procedures of tracking in a tropical jungle.

 

Our  jungle survival courses address the following:

Survival kit items
What to take
What not to take
Items specific to tropical conditions

Fire –
How to start a fire 
Types of fires
Fires for warmth
Fires for cooking
Fires for signaling
Underground fires

Cooking basics -
Cooking utensils and basic cooking skills

Strategy –
Setting priorities (basic needs)
Preparing for the unexpected
Weather concerns

Food –
Wild edible plant
Fishing
Hunting weapons
Building traps and snares
Food preparation

Shelter –
Finding suitable site
Types of shelters (including natural shelters)
Building shelters

Rope –
Making rope from plants
How to tie knots

Finding your way back –
Reading signs
Determining direction
Reading weather
How to use a compass and map

Moving –
Moving solo through the jungle
Moving a group of people
Planning food and water while traveling
Signaling

 

The Star
Travel & Adventure
Saturday August 25, 2007 byLEONG SIOK HUI

 
Will you be able to survive the ultimate wilderness test? In the last eight months, local newspapers have reported nine cases of lost trekkers in Malaysian forests. What does it take to get out alive?
 

 

 
Survival Basic

 
SHELTER
A shelter will keep away the rain and wind, and keep you warm. Look for a campsite that’s sheltered from the wind, a higher ground with less risk of flooding, safe from rock falls and away from animals’ watering holes. Most “lost” cases in Malaysia happen to day hikers, thus you’re likely not to carry a tent. You can make a simple A-frame shelter with a plastic sheet or your poncho and tree branches. Or gather some branches, make a frame and use leaves to cover up. Bamboo makes great shelters but be careful of sharp slivers or splinters when it is cut.

FIRE
A fire not only keeps you warm, it’s a morale booster and can be used as a smoke signal. In wet conditions, get dead branches off trees and shave them. It’s easy to kindle the fire this way, says Tham Yau Kong of TYK Adventures. Always carry matches/a lighter in waterproof bags. Dry bamboo, termite’s nests or cotton balls dipped in Vaseline make excellent tinder while twigs, small leaves and dry bark will keep the fire going.

SIGNALLING
Always bring your mobile phone – you never know where it will work. Don’t scream your lungs out – you’ll waste energy and your voice won’t travel far unless rescuers are within hearing distance. A whistle (pic) is a great piece of survival gear. If you need to start a signal fire, choose a clearing away from overhanging branches. Dig a trench or build an earth wall around the fire if it’s close to other trees or plants. Rubber tyres or green branches give a good, dense smoke. Spread out a reflective blanket (if you have one) to help searchers spot you from the air. Use a compact mirror, a knife blade, a thin foil or ready-made signal mirror with the sun to flash light signals.

FOOD
Though you can go without food for at least a week, hunger weakens the body and makes you more susceptible to hypothermia. Look out for wild fruits, roots, leaves, the soft heart of young stems or palm tree’s branches. Ferns and bamboo shoots are delicious. Though not appetising , boiled lichens are safe to eat. A tip for testing plants: if a plant smells of almonds (hydrocyanic acid) or peaches (prussic acid) when crushed, dump it. Rub a piece of crushed plant lightly on a soft skin area (inside of arm) and wait five minutes to check if any rash, swelling or burning appears. Worms (pic) and insects are a good source of protein if you can get over the squeamish factor.
 
For Wendy Chin Yoon Mun, Gunung Bunga Buah (1,430m) near Genting Highlands makes a nice day hike and is only a short drive away from the Klang Valley. It usually takes her about three to four hours to clamber up and down the peak. The experienced hiker has trekked the trail a few times and didn't think much of it when she led three friends on a climb one day.

The climb up was uneventful and as the group came down from the summit, Chin suggested they check out the source of a stream they spotted. The other two girls in the group decided to walk back to the trailhead where the car was parked. Chin and her friend ventured off the trail and followed the water source.

“At first, I knew where we were going but then I had an idea: we could find another way out to the main road if we followed the stream,” recalls Chin an assistant training manager with an outdoor school.

“We kept tabs on the time and decided to turn back by6pm if we didn’t find the other way out.”

The two hikers trudged on the unmarked trail through thick undergrowth while also keeping an eye on the stream. The trail didn’t seem to lead anywhere and when it was time to turn back, Chin and her friend backtracked.

“Somehow the trail looked different. Then we saw three waterfalls and we were like ‘Whoa, that’s strange because we didn’t pass these waterfalls on the way in’,” says Chin, 35.

They backtracked and took another trail but still couldn’t find the way out either. It was getting dark and the two decided to stick to one trail. “We just had to find a way out,” says Chin. by9pm, the forest was already pitch black and Chin realised they were lost. Luckily, the well-equipped Chin had a stove, poncho, parang and extra food.

“We picked a spot above the water source, set up shelter with my poncho, had a light dinner of muesli bars and went to sleep,” says Chin. The temperature had dipped and Chin was wearing shorts but she had a rain jacket to keep her warm. The pair didn’t have their mobile phones.

“We knew we would find our way out when daylight broke,” says Chin, who remained calm throughout. “I was more concerned about family and friends worrying about us.”
 

The Art of Staying Alive

 
In the SAS Survival Handbook, author John Lofty Wiseman says survival is the art of staying alive.

“You must know how to take everything possible from nature and use it to the fullest, how to attract attention to yourself so that rescuers can find you, how to make your way across unknown territory back to civilisation if hope of rescue is not on the cards and navigating without compass or map.”

Wiseman says any gear you have is a bonus. You not only have to keep healthy, you need to know First Aid in case you or your group members are sick or wounded AND maintain your morale.

Sounds like a tall order. But Chin’s case proves the point. Even the most experienced trekker can get lost due to a misstep or wrong  judgment. So, when you’re thrown into this kind of situation, what do you do?
 
When Lost
Stay calm and think positive,” advises Tham Yau Kong, one of the pioneer adventure operators in Sabah. In 1999, Tham and Sadib Miki set up Miki Survival Camp in a village at the foot of Mt

 Kinabalu. At the camp, students learn to identify edible food or fruits, pick up traditional healing skills

 using forest herbs, learn to build shelter and fashion animal traps out of forest products.

“Leave markers on the trail as you try to find your way out to ensure you’re not going in circles,” Tham adds.

If you still fail to find a way out, set up a base bybuilding a shelter and try to signal to alert others that you’re lost in the jungle. In the meantime, source for water and food to survive. (See sidebar on Survival Basics.)

Outward Bound Malaysia field instructor Azirin Aziz recommends trekking in a group of no less than four people as a safety measure.

“When lost, send out a trekker team (maybe two from the group) to clear and check tracks in order to determine the better path to take,” says Azirin who is based in Lumut, Perak.
 


 
“You should venture out about 100m forward, to the right and to the left from the original bearings to look out for visible features. Then return to the rest of the team and report. Try to gauge your location on the map if you have one.

“It’s good practice to walk on a ridge instead of in a valley because it’s easier to get spotted byrescuers from there. A valley’s feature is usually rocky with creeping vegetation. Streams are useful in determining direction, but they are not the safest terrain to walk on, Azirin adds.
 

Lessons learnt

 
In Chin’s case, a bunch of volunteers from the Association of Backpackers Malaysia (the lost hikers are members) and the police had started a search and rescue effort. At 7am the next day, Chin and her friend tried to retrace their footsteps. One-and-a-half hours later, they found their way out.
 

 
“It’s embarrassing. We are experienced trekkers but because we were overly confident and didn’t leave any markers, we got lost,” admits Chin. “Never assume you’ll find your way out of an unfamiliar place. Even though you don’t think you may get lost, sometimes people get injured in accidents or get disoriented. Just make sure you carry the kit.” ( See sidebar on Survival Kit.)

When you’re with a group of friends, it’s easy to let your guard down, Chin cautions. Always see where you’re going, know where you are and stay alert.

Sources: Wiseman, John Lofty SAS Survival Handbook; Harpers-Collins Publishers, 2003 and Hattingh, Garth The Outdoor Survival Manual; New-Holland Publishers, 2003.

Don’t lose your way

Prevention is the best cure, they say, so before setting out, it’s crucial to plan your trip, load up on the right gear, check the weather and ask yourself: Are you experienced enough to do the trek without a guide? Are you fit to tackle the trails? And do you have the right gear, maps and directions?

 
“Effective planning separates the responsible hiker from the common hiker,” says Azirin Aziz, an outdoor field instructor at Outward Bound Malaysia, Lumut.

“It’s important to spare your family, friends, the authorities and rescue organisations the anxiety.”
 

Recreational hikers should never attempt a tough and unfamiliar trek, especially without a guide, Azirin adds. Besides your basic survival kit, you need to know simple navigational skills using a compass and map.

Unfortunately, in Malaysia, the public has limited access to topography maps unless they are part of organisations like Outward Bound Malaysia or the Association of Backpackers Malaysia (ABM).*
 
Avid trailblazer C. S. Goh and his group of experienced adventurers find challenge in bushwhacking their way through pristine jungles in Peninsular Malaysia. Though Goh swears byhis GPS (Global Positioning System), he still relies on his map and compass-reading skills for back-up. GPS is reportedly 95% accurate and to receive clear signals, you need to stand still and out in the open, away from tree branches or any obstruction.

“I still have to take note of the direction I’m travelling in and observe the terrain or vegetation around me,” says Goh, a part-time trekking guide who organises jungle-trekking recces.

Keep an eye on what’s around you and make mental notes of lakes, rivers, caves and waterfalls. And don’t rely solely on your group leader in case you get separated from the group.

If you reach a junction and you’re not sure which trail to take, leave some markings, in case you go on the wrong trail and need to backtrack.

“I use a parang to make three slashes on both sides of the trees along the trail,” adds Goh.

“Try not to fold the tree branches as markers. It’s hard to spot them when it’s dark or if the trail is thick with bushes.”

Most importantly, always let someone know where you are going, when or what time you are expected back.

 

Jungle Survival Tips
 On a sunny day in June 2005, a family decided to go trekking in a jungle near Fraser Hill. Four boys lost their way and were finally found after 2 days of searching in the 8,000 sq m jungle with the help of police force and the special Senoi Paraaq trekkers.

People getting lost in the maze of rainforest fuel the headlines all the time

We once read a survival book that recommends climbing tree to get a good look around if you get lost in the jungle. The writer probably didn’t know that Malaysian trees grow in excess of 40 m, straight up, almost without branches. Kids from student camps we hosted during school holidays always comment that the jungle looked like “bar code” on soda cans. Climbing these trees are anything but easy.

Tree canopies shut the forest floor – and lost trekkers - from sunlight and directions. To complicate things further, in the jungle everything looks the same. There are no markers or distinctive landscape. No matter how often you go in and out of the jungle, packing yourself with some survival skills and knowledge are the best contrivance to bring along.

Here are some worthy tips.

Be realistic

You are lost and the worst thing you can do is to continue walking and drain yourself. Access your condition. Ask yourself: What do I need to do today, right now, to survive? How long can the food you packed last? Prioritising and do the most important chores first can help save your hide.

The looming nightfall and darkness is lost trekkers worst enemy. It’s also the time when 90% of wildlife come out to hunt and find food - that’s you, if you’re not careful. If nightfall is drawing near, looking out for a safe shelter to spend the night should be your priority.

Go with the flow

Chances are, you fair better getting lost in the rainforest than anywhere else. Our forest is mostly damp and most plants are soaked in dew in the mornings. Collect dew and rain water with large leafs. Small stream in the jungle is mostly pristine and is safe to drink. Also remember, the smallest tickle always strings itself to a bigger waterway. Go with the flow and you’d usually end up near a river – and human settlement.

Pack smart, not more

When packing your stuffs, always put some thought for “what if I’m lost” essentials. Keep all your survival items into one waist bag and don’t leave camp without it. Below are the must-haves in your survival kit and collectively they should not weight more than 1kg;

1. Carry at least 3 ways to start a fire – Vaseline soaked cotton balls, magnifying glass and cigarette lighter.
2. A small bottle of iodine to disinfect water. Use 1 small drop for every litre.
3. A few zip lock bags for holding water.
4. Dental floss (100m). It’s a light and tough string with many uses.
5. Mini flashlight.
6. Heavy duty garbage bag. It makes great raincoat and waterproof shelter. You can also use it to collect rainwater.
7. All purpose knife made of carbon-steel that can throw sparks when struck on granite.
8. A bottle of antibiotic ointment.
9. Some energy bars.
10. A whistle to draw attention.

Au naturel

Although it’s not easy to find natural resources dry enough to start a fire in the damp forest, some resins, like the keruing tree’s, and bark strips are good fire starters. Look out for natural shelters. Young Leonard Hendrik and Milos Johed who got lost in 2005 in Bau, Sarawak made a cave their home for two nights before being found. Note what wildlife eats in the forest; monkeys are the best indicators. If it’s edible to them, it is most probably to you too.

Draw attention

Break off branches at eye-level, 5 feet above the ground, along the path to help rescue team track you. One can also leave heaps of stones, piles of branches or leafs for the same purpose. A whistle never fails to draw attention and its piercing shrill can echo far.

When making a smoke signal, you get more smoke byadding leaves than wood to the bonfire. Understand that from the air you’ll be a tiny dot. Find an open spot where the plume can rise beyond the forest canopy.

Caveat - take care not to start a forest fire and jeopardize yourself.

Getting along with wildlife

Walking around the rainforest is not like walking through the carnivorous exhibit’s cage in the zoo wearing a sheep’s skin. Carnivorous animals like to mark their territory and leave plenty of clues. So pay attention.

So, if you’re worried about stumbling into a hungry beast, it won’t happen. Firstly, the jungle is too dense for your eyes to make anything out of it. A camouflaged flying fox can fly pass you in a blink. Secondly, your human scent is strange to them and wildlife almost definitely scoots off before you see them. The only ones aren’t backing off are females defending their little ones or nest. So, do give way to a nursing mum.

Keep your sense of humor

Staying positive is everything.

With practice, movement through thick undergrowth and jungle can be done efficiently. Always wear long sleeves to avoid cuts and scratches.

To move easily, you must develop "jungle eye," that is, you should not concentrate on the pattern of bushes and trees to your immediate front. You must focus on the jungle further out and find natural breaks in the foliage. Look through the jungle, not at it. Stop and stoop down occasionally to look along the jungle floor. This action may reveal game trails that you can follow.

Stay alert and move slowly and steadily through dense forest or jungle. Stop periodically to listen and take your bearings. Use a machete to cut through dense vegetation, but do not cut unnecessarily or you will quickly wear yourself out. If using a machete, stroke upward when cutting vines to reduce noise because sound carries long distances in the jungle. Use a stick to part the vegetation. Using a stick will also help dislodge biting ants, spiders, or snakes. Do not grasp at brush or vines when climbing slopes; they may have irritating spines or sharp thorns.

Many jungle and forest animals follow game trails. These trails wind and cross, but frequently lead to water or clearings. Use these trails if they lead in your desired direction of travel.

In many countries, electric and telephone lines run for miles through sparsely inhabited areas. Usually, the right-of-way is clear enough to allow easy travel. When traveling along these lines, be careful as you approach transformer and relay stations. In enemy territory, they may be guarded.

 

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           ISLAND BASE    
           KAPAS ISLAND              LANGKAWI  ISLAND           LANG TENGAH ISLAND
           PANGKOR ISLAND              PEMANGGIL ISLAND           PENANG ISLAND
           PERHENTIAN ISLAND              PULAU BESAR           REDANG ISLAND
           SIBU ISLAND                RAWA ISLAND           TINGGI ISLAND
           TIOMAN ISLAND                        TENGGOL ISLAND
     
          bySTATES    
           JOHORE              KEDAH           KELANTAN
           KUALA LUMPUR              MALACCA           NEGERI SEMBILAN (Port Dickson)
           PAHANG              PENANG           PERAK
           PERLIS              SABAH           SARAWAK
           SELANGOR              TERENGGANU          
     
         byVENUES OF SPECIAL INTERESTS KNOWN FOR TEAM BUILDING PROGRAMS

           BANDING ISLAND

             BUKIT MERAH LAKETOWN           SELESA BUKIT TINGGI
           EAGLE RANCH              ENDAU ROMPIN            JANDA BAIK BUKIT TINGGI
           KENYIR LAKE              KINABALU PARK           SEA GYPSIES SIBU ISLAND
           SEDIM RECREATION PARK              SUMMERSET ROMPIN           TROLAK COUNTRY RESORT

           TAMAN NEGARA

   
                            

 

       Click Here for Links to Adventure and Eco destinations in Malaysia 

     Links to other  Hotels & Apartments  in MALAYSIA

Index

Apartments

Bukit Tinggi

Bukit Merah Laketown

Cameron Highlands

Cherating

Desaru

Frasers Hill

Gem Island 

Genting Highlands

Ipoh

Johore Bahru

Johore

Kapas

KLIA Airport

Kenyir Lake

Kuantan

Kedah

Kuala Lumpur

Kelantan

Labuan

Langkawi Island

Lang Tengah

Layang-Layang Island

Malacca

Petaling Jaya

Pulau Tinggi

Pulau Besar

Pedu Lake

Pahang

Perhentian Island

Penang Island

Port Dickson

Pangkor Island

Redang Island

Sarawak

Sabah

Sipadan Island

Sibu Island

Selangor

Terengganu

Taman Negara (National Park)

Tioman Island

Tenggol Island

   Others

   

Golf Courses in Malaysia

Berjaya Hotels Group Malaysia & Singapore

    Links to Hotels & Apartments byAlphabetical Order

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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